Mosaic Minds Podcast

Episode 9 | AI in 2024 | What Can We Expect For The Rest of The Decade

April 09, 2024 Mosaic Minds Media Season 1 Episode 9
Episode 9 | AI in 2024 | What Can We Expect For The Rest of The Decade
Mosaic Minds Podcast
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Mosaic Minds Podcast
Episode 9 | AI in 2024 | What Can We Expect For The Rest of The Decade
Apr 09, 2024 Season 1 Episode 9
Mosaic Minds Media

Chat GPT, Chat bots, Virtual Support...  What's in store for us in the future with AI and new technology.  Is it something to embrace, something to fear, or maybe a little of both?

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Show Notes Transcript

Chat GPT, Chat bots, Virtual Support...  What's in store for us in the future with AI and new technology.  Is it something to embrace, something to fear, or maybe a little of both?

Check out Mosaic Minds' Video Podcast: mosaic.minds.podcast
TikTok: mosaic.minds.podcast
Instagram: mosaic.minds.podcast
LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/company/mosaic-minds-podcast
Facebook: mosaicmindspodcast
X (Twitter): mosaic_podcast

Website: mosaicmindspodcast.com

Contact us for booking and show ideas: mosaicminds37@gmail.com

Nick Williams:

Welcome to Mosaic Minds. My name is Nick and this is Crystal. And today we are, uh, one host shy. He's at a, uh, fishing tournament trying to win us, um, 30 grand. So let's hope that that goes well for him. Um, today we're going to talk about AI and what, uh, All that means, but not just, uh, AI like chat GPT, but I think that crystal did some research on some other things, correct? Yes. All right. So let's, uh, let's go ahead and get into it. Welcome to mosaic minds, the podcast where every episode is a colorful blend of perspectives, ideas, and conversations. Each week, our diverse team of hosts brings their unique backgrounds, experiences, and interests to the table. Mosaic. Mosaic Minds is your invitation to join the conversation to see the world through a kaleidoscope of viewpoints. So grab a seat, tune in, and let the mosaic unfold before you. Okay, so lots of things come to mind when we think about AI. You know, we think about, there was the movie years ago, um, with, uh, Haley, Haley Joel Ossman and, um, Tom Cruise or not Tom Cruise, Tom Hanks, do you know what I'm talking about? Like I, not iRobot, that was something different, wasn't it?

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, iRobot was the one with Will Smith.

Nick Williams:

Okay. Um, so yeah, I mean there, but lots of people think of different things. Space

Crystal Robertson:

Odyssey 2000.

Nick Williams:

Is that the one where it's like, no.

Crystal Robertson:

Where the robot, like, Hank, like, ended up having, like, trying to go after humanity.

Nick Williams:

Who's in that? I don't remember, it's an old one. Yeah. Is that the one where like the AI person is like talking, talking to the guy? And I forget what his name was, but she's like, no, John, you know, you know what I'm talking about? But I think now, like when people think of AI, they think of, um, you know, like Chad, GBT and, um, that kind of thing to where, you know, you can have it, you know, Look up, you know, different search results or write you a A paper or something like that. So what's the first thing that you want to talk about crystal?

Crystal Robertson:

Well, I think a lot of people have a lot of fear with AI right now, especially because there's people like Elon Musk and other big names, like telling people that AI can be the downfall of humanity and all this stuff. But we, I think we're afraid for the wrong reasons. Like people are always talking about how they're afraid of like the robots, like Taking over and killing everybody. And, you know, we off Alexa and it comes after us one day and like, we'll make jokes about it, but I think a lot of people are actually afraid of that. And I think we're really afraid of the

Nick Williams:

wrong thing. Well, the scary thing is that every time somebody puts something in there and searches for something, they are teaching it, right? So it just continues to get. smarter and smarter the more curious that we get and the more things that we search for, right?

Crystal Robertson:

Well, that's what intelligence is all about. It's all about improving what we have And we have to we I mean if the only way we wouldn't improve Our technology is if we were to have an ice age or something to like wipe out our technology or people and the only option we have is to improve it. We just have to make sure that we do it in the right way. Um, I think a big part of it is we have to maintain these systems, but one of these days we're going to build something smarter than us that's going to be able to improve itself. And I think that's where CHAT GPT is kind of giving you a glimpse of that, where it's always learning. And I think that's where we need to be careful. Once we can build an AI system that is smarter than us, that can improve itself.

Nick Williams:

Well, so my, my daughter brought up a good point. She said that basically what AI is, is it's an algorithm. So at least at this point, there's no way for an algorithm to learn from itself. So that will be whenever it becomes, you know, when it becomes a problem is whenever it starts to be able to learn from itself and some has some kind of like synthetic. Emotions and that kind of thing.

Crystal Robertson:

Well, that's the thing. It won't have emotions. We'll have to program our own values into it because like I was listening to a lot of Ted talks on AI and one point that they all made was that we have to make sure that we are aligning our values with these AI systems, because if they have their own. If they start being able to do things for themselves, if their goals aren't aligned with ours, that's where the downfall of humanities starts.

Nick Williams:

It seems like it's, it always seemed like it was just so far away into the future. And now it's like, it's something that is actually conceivable, you know, like with the different things that are, that are coming up, I know that I use, like I've used chat GPT a lot.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, I mean, it is close, but at the same time, a lot of like AI researchers and stuff will say that worrying about, um, like AI taking over is like worrying about overpopulation on Mars because it is so far away. Um, but then there's other researchers who are saying that by in 100 years, 90 percent of our workforce will be unemployed. Yeah. Because the top 90 percent will just be unnecessary.

Nick Williams:

Right. So that's, that's a different kind of, of taking over. Just like when we think of terrorism, we think of like nuke, nuclear missiles and that kind of thing. We don't think about like the power grid coming down, you know, or. Um, you know, taking down all of the, um, all the internet and everything that would cause such craziness, right? All right. Well, you were telling, you were talking about some, cause I, I hadn't heard of this, you were talking about some kind of, um, Google AI thing or something like that. So I figured I would bring, I'll bring that up. Yeah. Google Gemini. Hey, give me an example of something that I should.

Crystal Robertson:

So what I like to do with Google Gemini is to find travel stuff. So you can say like, Hey, find me a hotel in Hawaii on July 2nd with a restaurant nearby, and you can be more specific. You can put price ranges in there. Um, I did that when I was looking up some stuff. Oh. Well, that's fun. That's

Nick Williams:

okay. Well, let's try something. What was the one that you showed me earlier?

Crystal Robertson:

Okay. Do, um, find me a hotel in Las Vegas on July 9th for under 200 with bars nearby.

Nick Williams:

Okay. So that, that brought us up a list of stuff.

Crystal Robertson:

Uh, that's the old stuff from Hawaii. That's it was suggesting to you.

Nick Williams:

Oh, Oh, it was still

Crystal Robertson:

thinking. Yeah. It was still thinking.

Nick Williams:

Google slow. All right. So there you go. That's pretty cool. That is pretty, pretty specific.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah. So it gives you like a rundown of the hotel and then, um, what, how, how many stars it has on Google. And then the price for that specific night. And then, um, there should be a list of like bars and stuff that are near some of the hotels. So let's try.

Nick Williams:

What is the best strip club in Indianapolis?

Crystal Robertson:

Oh my God.

Nick Williams:

I just want to see what Google Gemini's opinion is. I can't, I can't tell you definitely which is the best in quotes, their strip club in Indianapolis as preferences can vary. So it just gives a, yeah, so it gives us the, I'd say that that, I mean, like, I'm not a big strip club person, but I would say that that's from what I've heard, I'd say that's pretty accurate.

Crystal Robertson:

I have no idea. I haven't heard anything about the strip club scene. Like

Nick Williams:

I have, I have literally only been to one strip club in my life. And it was, it was after hours because like a bartender that I worked with, her husband was a manager there. So like after we got off work, we went there and we just had some drinks. And yeah, I mean, there was a few like topless chicks walking around, but for them, I mean, we didn't see any. Any dancing or anything like that? Oh, i'm not opposed to going but I've just it's never been my thing. I would go with like as like a camaraderie thing with like a group of Guys for like a bachelor party. Yeah like that, but I can't imagine being one of those people that was like It's your Friday night. I'm lonely. And you know what I mean? Like, I'm going to spray on the cheap cologne and go

Crystal Robertson:

to bed. Spend a bunch of money to watch women get naked I can't touch.

Nick Williams:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Hold the, you know, hold the cookie and tell you you can't bite it. Exactly.

Crystal Robertson:

I've been to a strip club once too, and that was in Florida when I was like 19 or 20 with a group of guys. And I remember the girls kept trying to get me to go on stage.

Nick Williams:

Why don't you tell us, since we're on the subject here. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Why don't you tell us about this male revue that you went to?

Crystal Robertson:

So, I went to a male revue show with my sister in Lafayette, and it, there was like, there was five guys, and so it was like, upstairs in this venue, um, and there, it had its own bar that was off to the side, and they would just like, come out, and they would have women who like, paid money to go on stage, and they would bring them on stage, and they would dance with them, and. Um, and then, you know, go change outfits and put on a little show and yeah, there's like two black guys, two Latin guys, and then a white guy, they called the Reggae Knock.

Nick Williams:

Okay. So you were saying that there was, um, there was Latino dancers and there was, uh, black dancers and Vanilla as well. Yes.

Crystal Robertson:

One, one white guy who, um, Like walked around with an axe and he had like his head all tatted up and stuff.

Nick Williams:

Why did he walk around with an axe?

Crystal Robertson:

Because he was doing the whole like Viking thing. Oh, okay.

Nick Williams:

Yeah. Is that a, is that a thing for women? Are they attracted to Vikings? I guess.

Crystal Robertson:

I guess since he was the only white guy and he had a long white beard, or a long beard, he just went for the Viking, Viking story. He had a long white beard? There was a No, no, not white. Long beard. I was

Nick Williams:

like, Jesus Christ. How old are these, uh, are these dancers? I think

Crystal Robertson:

most of them were really young. Like the Latino guys looked like they were in their early twenties. And I felt really weird when they got too close to me, I was like, I'm 38. Stay arm's length.

Nick Williams:

Are you not, are you not proud to be a cougar?

Crystal Robertson:

I'm not a cougar. You wouldn't be a cougar?

Nick Williams:

No,

Crystal Robertson:

I don't, I don't like younger guys. It's

Nick Williams:

cause you have a son. Yeah,

Crystal Robertson:

I don't know. I just see younger guys. They look all like young and scurdy and I'm like, uh. See, like I'm old and fat, not fat, old and fit, maybe, but yeah, uh, when they're closer to my daughter's age than mine, it's creepy.

Nick Williams:

I'm not going to make any comments on that because yeah. All right. So let's see. So let's see what's something else that we can look at here. I'm gonna see, uh, you know, I'm ready to get. The fk out of Indiana, um, so I'm gonna let's see what I can find here and see I want to kind of want to Go to I'm gonna go to Florida. My friend Sarah lives there and I'd like to visit her. So, let's see. She lives near St. Pete. Okay, so let's do What? Would let's see Just search for houses in st. Pete. Well, she's but she's got she has a place. I'm not I'm I don't want to

Crystal Robertson:

What are you looking

Nick Williams:

for? Okay, what when would be the cheapest and that's right. Yes. I have to read every word. I type when It would be the cheapest time To go to to Fly to St. Petersburg soon. This might be my new favorite one. If it actually like gives me an acceptable answer,

Crystal Robertson:

right?

Nick Williams:

Uh, assuming you mean St. Peter's water, which I do, that's correct. Pie. May and September to October, the shoulder seasons, May and September through October. Well, that's not soon. So, well, man,

Crystal Robertson:

I'm talking about like,

Nick Williams:

you know,

Crystal Robertson:

even with AI, this is just the beginning of it. Right. I mean, we don't really know. What kind of AI stuff they're doing?

Nick Williams:

Now, who's they let's, let's be

Crystal Robertson:

what the military, I mean, our government in general, uh, just tech companies, anybody like, we don't know, they're probably having a contest to see who can get the smartest system first. You know what I mean? Like the space race. Right, exactly. And you know what, if AI is like the space race, that's not good because we need to go at it. At a slower pace, it's not something that we need to race toward because it needs to be done right.

Nick Williams:

But if it, but if it is a race, we need to win, right? When you agree with that. Who's we? We is in the United States. I

Crystal Robertson:

don't know. Do you trust? I mean.

Nick Williams:

No, I don't trust the United States, but I, but I,

Crystal Robertson:

I trust. Our government or tech companies, because who do you trust with it?

Nick Williams:

Well, selfishly, since I live here, um, I, I don't. I don't want to be on the receiving end of a, of a butt raping. You know what I mean? So, um, a proverbial AI butt raping.

Crystal Robertson:

Right.

Nick Williams:

So

Crystal Robertson:

when it comes to like military, I think it would be a good thing. Right. Cause people are afraid of autonomous weapons because of them getting in the wrong hands, but at the same time, think about the good it can do with, you know, all the lives we would save from all the people we wouldn't have to send overseas as soon as they graduate high school, you know, to go handle these weapons. And so they could be handling them from miles away in a safe area.

Nick Williams:

But would it really, would it save more lives? Whenever Since there's no kind of, uh, humanity or emotion or anything in the AI, like, couldn't it potentially take more lives than it could save? Like, since it's not making logical Decisions.

Crystal Robertson:

Well, I mean, we'd still be controlling it. So as long as we're making logical decisions and we still have humanity, I think we'd be fine.

Nick Williams:

So are you, are you considering like drones as AI? Is that, are you?

Crystal Robertson:

I mean, no, I mean, I think they're the start of it, but they, they're, they're heat seeking. And if we had AI, it would be more of like, there'd be, it would be more specific information on where it could go and how it could do it. And I think, you know, it could travel further and, um, think about the thing, the inputs that we put into it instead of just, you know, He's seeking,

Nick Williams:

you know what I mean? Yeah. So, so what would you say? Like, what do you think are some of the, some of the more negative things? I mean, like, let's start with, um, when it comes to education and we were talking about people using chat GP to write papers and that kind of thing. Like, are you, is that, do you think that's a legitimate concern?

Crystal Robertson:

I mean, I think plagiarism has always been a legitimate concern for teachers. Of course, it's going to get harder for them to get a handle on it with AI and with kids being able to use it. But at the same time with education, I think AI has so many good things that could potentially do for us. Um, for example, uh, my son just took a test to be in high ability English. And then, He had to, after taking this test, just to see if he could test to be in high ability, he had to take another test and then take another test for language classes and then take the state test. And if they had some type of AI program, they could answer maybe five or 10 questions, have all these placements, have their state test stuff and be done with it.

Nick Williams:

Yeah, that makes sense. I just know, I know myself. I know that. If I were, if, if a chat GPT around when I was in school, I would have, you know, I would have never written a paper, although I guess they have ways to detect it. Um, but I'm sure if they have ways to detect it, they also have different apps or programs that you can use to, um, D AI it, you know what I mean? Like kind of, uh, alter it so that you can't detect it with AI. I would assume. Have you heard of anything like that?

Crystal Robertson:

I haven't, but that would make sense. Maybe take it and run it through another program to make it less sound, less like AI and jumbled up a little bit. I don't really know. I would say just rewrite it a little bit. I mean, that's what I would have done.

Nick Williams:

I mean, I think that, cause I think that in the future, I think that, that once people realize that things like that are inevitable, that they will, instead of making it. To where you can't use it for school. Instead, they'll teach you better ways to use it for school and for life. And so, you know, like what, if this is going to be the next thing, like what are the best ways to give it commands to come out with the, you know, with the best results and, and that kind of thing. Um, but I'm hoping that that won't become a primary source of when it comes to things like medicine, you know what I mean? Or, or things that, that actually have to do with, uh, with life, life or death, AI stuff. Um, pertaining to medicine and that sort of thing.

Crystal Robertson:

I think AI in medicine would be amazing because it would reduce human error. I mean, we could potentially find a cure for Alzheimer's and different types of cancer. And when they can't diagnose, I mean, some people are so hard to diagnose. I went to doctor after doctor after doctor before they found, realized I had fibromyalgia because it's so hard to diagnose. And, you know, there's other ailments that people get, you know, they have those like medical shows where people go to doctors for years and being told they're crazy. I mean, AI could make all that stuff not a problem anymore because it could just diagnose people.

Nick Williams:

Yeah, so I mean, I think you're right. I think for for like research and theory that that would be great for medicine but I'm more talking about like practice, you know, like when it comes to actually practicing medicine and surgeries and things like that because I could see that trying to be used in You know different Aspects of surgery. And to me, that's, that's, I, I don't care if humans do make error. I would rather have a human, an actual human being, um, cutting me open rather than a machine. Wouldn't you agree with that?

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah. I mean, when I was in the Navy, uh, we had to get all, you basically have to get all your shots all over again. They don't care what you've had. You're getting everything. Plus. More who knows what they put in me, but basically you take a step in this line and there's these machines with these big arms that come down and jab these shots into you. And then you take another step and you're standing like this. That's crazy. Yeah. And then there's these two big arms that come down and jab shots into you. What? Yeah. And it was terrifying because I was afraid of them going. Too deep or missing, you know, get the wrong spot or something like that. And so the thought of like, um, a scalpel actually like cutting me open and doing surgery on me. Absolutely not.

Nick Williams:

Yeah. That's, that's like dystopian there. That's, that's insane, right? Yeah. That

Crystal Robertson:

was in 2005 too. So I can only imagine what they have now.

Nick Williams:

So, so like these arms would just. They would literally come down and like put a shot in you?

Crystal Robertson:

Yep, then you take another step and then there's another one and

Nick Williams:

That's insane.

Crystal Robertson:

That's how you get your injections in the Navy.

Nick Williams:

Well, wow. Well, uh, I mean, I wonder if They should start doing shots like that in the health department. Go a lot faster. Yeah. No tender care when it comes to the children, just like if they cry, they just like the arms just like move them out of the way. They have little arms to hold them. Well, I think, I mean, we're kind of talking to people as if people already know, well, I'm kind of talking to people as if people already know what This stuff is and what, uh, chat, GBT and AI and all that is, but I kind of wanted to show some examples of, cause I mean, this, this is pretty, pretty amazing stuff. I mean, um, whenever I show some, someone this for the first time, like even when I showed Jason, you know, he was like, he's like, dude, that is, he's like, that is wild. All right. Yeah. So I mean, it's, it's pretty cool. I, even though I, I use it a lot, like it's still to me, like, I, I think it's bad ass. But like, so, so let's say like, even for something like this, let's say that, right, me a script, say, write me a script for a cat food commercial that has a really ugly cat, poor cat and an abusive. Owner. It

Crystal Robertson:

sounds like a terrible commercial.

Nick Williams:

Look at this, though. We have a script. Is this not crazy? I mean, like, that it just So Okay, now I'm, like, super curious, so I kind of want to read it. Do you want to be, uh, I'll be the narrator. Okay. Wait, no, because the other's a man. You be the narrator.

Crystal Robertson:

Okay. Meet Whiskers, the cat who's had a rough start in life, neglected and mistreated by his owner. He's hungry for love and nourishment. Meh. Meh.

Nick Williams:

Uh, we just have to read that. Oh,

Crystal Robertson:

the man sweats at Whiskers, causing the, oh, swats at Whiskers, causing the cat to cover and retreat.

Nick Williams:

Get out of here, you ugly mutt. Isn't that a cat?

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, I don't know why it's calling him a mutt. Scroll down, I can't see.

Nick Williams:

Okay.

Crystal Robertson:

Whiskers scampers away, looking forlorn, but every pet deserves a chance at happiness. That's where Purry's Delight comes in. Uh, let's see. Purry's Delight, made with real chicken and fish, packed with essential nutrients to keep your feline friend healthy and happy. Whiskers tentatively takes a bite of cat food, his eyes widening in delight. He starts eating eagerly with purries delay every meal taste of joy for your beloved pet Why settle for anything less?

Nick Williams:

Yeah, so that's crazy that you can just you know what I mean? You can just put in a Ask it for a script or whatever um, i've definitely i've used it for Eat lots of emails and text messages and things like that. Really?

Crystal Robertson:

I've used it once sure twice for emails like at work, but I think writers are really going to be the first ones to be out of a job. I mean,

Nick Williams:

or either that I'd love to step up their game or kind of like I was saying before, they will learn ways to use that kind of thing to their benefit. You know, like

Crystal Robertson:

they might just start getting paid less.

Nick Williams:

Cause

Crystal Robertson:

I know I was a writer for a long time before this and like they already started cutting our pay because they were just hiring really bad writers for like lower pay after a while. Um, and I can only imagine that they would just pay people even half because they could use this stuff. You know, let's forget that you wrote copy. Yeah. I was a copywriter for a long time. I did a lot of SEO work and yeah. Symptoms like medical symptoms.

Nick Williams:

Medical symptoms.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, I wanna see what happens.

Nick Williams:

I have a swollen robe a swollen ear lobe. Uh,

Crystal Robertson:

lots of

Nick Williams:

reasons why you could

Crystal Robertson:

have swollen

Nick Williams:

ear lobes. Swollen earlobe could be caused by various factors ranging from minor issues to more serious conditions. Here are a few possible explanations. This is just like, this is like, um, WebMD on crack. This is like, you know. Kind of an

Crystal Robertson:

easier way to Google things. Yeah. Yeah.

Nick Williams:

This is going to freak some people out.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, because everyone's going to have cancer with CHAT GPC too.

Nick Williams:

Yeah.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, I don't think that part will be any better quite yet. But, you know, eventually, like we said, you know, if they can use it for diagnostic purposes and stuff, I mean, that could eventually trickle down to the common person being able to just put their symptoms in some kind of program and being told what they have. And maybe they know if they have to go to a doctor or specialist or just sleep it off.

Nick Williams:

Sounds like that sounds like something they would use for, um, people that were Less fortunate like people on Medicaid.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, I mean, that'd be great for everybody. I don't have Medicaid, but I'd rather not go to the doctor

Nick Williams:

Yeah, I agree Have some fun with it. So let's have it right. Let's do a poem. So write a poem.

Crystal Robertson:

Okay here Let me put in the prompt this time.

Nick Williams:

Okay, go for it It's kind of like Mad Libs Has that feel A poem about a ghost that is in love with a werewolf and can't perform?

Crystal Robertson:

Yes. Okay. Yeah, we'll see you with that.

Nick Williams:

All right, I want to read it. Okay. In the moon's soft glow where shadows dance, a ghostly figure roams, lost in love's trance. This doesn't really have the, the beat to it. Okay, fine. I'll do it as a rap. In the moon's soft glow where shadows dance, A ghostly figure roams lost in love's trance. Whispers echo through the night's embrace, A haunting melody. A spectral grace. Through misty veil the ghost does glide, looking for a love that can't be denied. In the heart of the forest, where secrets dwell, she finds her beloved under the spell. But alas, her love is gone. A werewolf bold, With fur of silver and eyes of gold, Through fierce and wild, In the light of the moon, His passion wanes, His spirit swoon. For cursed is he, By a fate unkind, A soul divided, A troubled mind, Though his heart's, Though his heart beats fierce, With desire, His lupine form of barrier dark. His lupine. Yet still the ghost holds him dear, whispering love into his ear. She cradles his soul with tender care, knowing their love is beyond compare. Together they roam, in the dead of the night, in a world where darkness meets light. For in their hearts, love will endure, a ghost and a werewolf, forevermore.

Crystal Robertson:

I think I should just write a poem book with Chad GVD.

Nick Williams:

Like I could sit here for hours and do this. Okay, hold on. I would not want to do one. I'm going to try something else.

Crystal Robertson:

So we've seen what it can do. We've seen what jobs it can take. We have. Are you worried it's going to take your job?

Nick Williams:

No. No. No, nobody can do my job.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah. I, I, I think if my job was automated, it would be after a lot of other jobs, , because it, it's really my job to do like a. A bunch of automated thing. Yeah, it's kind of hard to explain, but

Nick Williams:

With my job, I get to play whipping boy to people that are, that get pissed off sometimes. And, you know, it's really hard to cuss out a machine.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah, same.

Nick Williams:

So, I think that people would I know I get really irritated when I have to email for support. I can do chat, but email? Like if I can't call or if I very least can't chat, it drives me crazy. So if I don't even know for sure if I'm the, and the, the, um, the AI chat or like AI, the bots or whatever for support, those drive me nuts.

Crystal Robertson:

Yeah. I don't like them either. I'd rather just talk to a person. So after all this, what is your biggest fear about AI?

Nick Williams:

Uh, I am, when it comes to technology, I'm more of an optimist. So like, I really don't have much fear of it. That's good. Uh, I would still, I guess I wouldn't say it's a fear, but like, I guess my only concern, which probably wouldn't happen in my lifetime would be, I really wouldn't want somebody, Performing any kind of like life threatening whatever on me, surgery, anything like that, or even like dental stuff, like that's freaky. A robot

Crystal Robertson:

doing dental work on you? Can you imagine? Like, like

Nick Williams:

all of a sudden there's a glitch or it gets hacked or something and it's just, you know, like clicks your teeth out. I think

Crystal Robertson:

robots will be more for menial work than anything, at least for a long time. Like they'll be digging ditches and stuff like that, but making burgers, but The world needs ditch diggers, but we're all verges sugars gonna go.

Nick Williams:

Mm hmm. And then yeah, you know that that well That was part of the argument not to get political But that was part of the argument the argument whenever they were wanting to increase Minimum wage so much was you know, they're going and if you've noticed a lot of restaurants now, they have those They have those boards. I think we talked about this already, but they have like those boards that you order on. So I don't know. So it does make things easier. I'm sure there's like positive and negatives. If, uh, if anybody has any other comments or ideas of what could be considered negative or positive to this, please just put those in the comments or you can email us. Um,

Crystal Robertson:

or if you know any cool AI stuff that's going on, let us know. Yeah. Yeah.

Nick Williams:

And if you are an AI and you want to be a guest on our show, also, we'd

Crystal Robertson:

love to interview you. Yeah.

Nick Williams:

Interview you, program you, whatever, whatever. Ooh, an AI massage.

Crystal Robertson:

That'd be great.

Nick Williams:

I'm me too. Yeah.

Crystal Robertson:

Cause I can turn it up. Like, yeah.

Nick Williams:

Cause I mean, I'm like anytime I've been to like urban air or any of those places where the parent, they give like the parents, the, uh, massage chairs do. I'm all about that. Like don't you want to jump? I know no Chair that I just paid 20 put a 20 bill in for an hour Yeah, it's pretty cool Um, but hey, thanks for uh, thanks for being with us again Please like subscribe and if you're listening, please, uh, give us a five star review And we will um be back next tuesday. See you next week