Mosaic Minds Podcast

Episode 5 | Veteran NASCAR Crew Member, Mike Lingerfelt

March 12, 2024 Mosaic Minds Media Season 1 Episode 5
Episode 5 | Veteran NASCAR Crew Member, Mike Lingerfelt
Mosaic Minds Podcast
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Mosaic Minds Podcast
Episode 5 | Veteran NASCAR Crew Member, Mike Lingerfelt
Mar 12, 2024 Season 1 Episode 5
Mosaic Minds Media

Today's guest is Mike Lingerfelt.  Mike is a retired tire-changer and veteran Nascar Crew Member.  He has worked for big names such as Tony Stewart and Jimmie Johnson.  He currently manages multiple boat dealerships, and likes to spend his free time fishing.  Lets get to know Mike Lingerfelt.

Follow Mike on Social Media:
Twitter (X): https://twitter.com/mikelingerfelt
Instagram:   https://www.instagram.com/mikelingerfelt

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Website: mosaicmindspodcast.com

Contact us for booking and show ideas: mosaicminds37@gmail.com

Show Notes Transcript

Today's guest is Mike Lingerfelt.  Mike is a retired tire-changer and veteran Nascar Crew Member.  He has worked for big names such as Tony Stewart and Jimmie Johnson.  He currently manages multiple boat dealerships, and likes to spend his free time fishing.  Lets get to know Mike Lingerfelt.

Follow Mike on Social Media:
Twitter (X): https://twitter.com/mikelingerfelt
Instagram:   https://www.instagram.com/mikelingerfelt

Check out Mosaic Minds' Video Podcast: mosaic.minds.podcast
TikTok: mosaic.minds.podcast
Instagram: mosaic.minds.podcast
LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/company/mosaic-minds-podcast
Facebook: mosaicmindspodcast
X (Twitter): mosaic_podcast

Website: mosaicmindspodcast.com

Contact us for booking and show ideas: mosaicminds37@gmail.com

Mike Lingerfelt:

A few years ago, I was fortunate enough to be picked out of seven people in the world to be in a commercial for Jägermeister. So they flew seven of us to Prague to film a commercial for a brotherhood that they picked one person from every aspect of a sport that they wanted to pick. So they picked myself from NASCAR. They picked Keeson Johnson from football, Rob Smets from PBR bullfighting, Nathan Fletcher, big wave surfer, Freddie Roach, who was Manny Pacquiao's trainer, Mr. Cartoon, Mark Matrado, that's a famed tattoo artist, Uh, California and, uh, Kerry King from Slayer.

Nick Williams:

Welcome to Mosaic Minds, the podcast where every episode is a colorful blend of perspectives, ideas, and conversations. Each week, our diverse team of hosts brings their unique backgrounds, experiences, and interests to the table. Mosaic Minds is your invitation to join the conversation to see the world through a kaleidoscope of viewpoints. So grab a seat, tune in. And let the mosaic unfold before you.

Jason Yocum:

All right, Mosaic Mines tonight. I got Crystal and Nick with me here, uh, podcast co host of Mosaic Mines. Tonight we're gonna have our first guest. So we're excited. We went through some, um, Tech things tonight, and we're excited to have Mike on tonight. So just a quick bio of Mike. Um, he's a retired NASCAR tire changer with 25 years of experience. He worked in the shop as a mechanic and on the road crew. He's won seven cup championships, eight pit crew championships, won 99 cup races over a 25 year decorated career, avid fresh and saltwater fishermen, retired recently due to injury, and currently the general manager of two boat dealerships in North Carolina. So mosaic minds, crowd. Give a warm welcome to Mike Lingerfeld. How are you doing tonight, Mike?

Mike Lingerfelt:

I'm good. Thank y'all for having me on. I look forward to having some fun with y'all tonight and talking a little bit of everything.

Jason Yocum:

Sounds like a good plan. We're excited to have you. So, uh, we're going to get started by just asking you a few questions here. Mike, um, walk us through a typical day in the life of a NASCAR, uh, tire changer during your active career.

Mike Lingerfelt:

You know, the. According to which day of the week it is, right? I worked in the shop as well. So we'd be at the shop at seven o'clock. Doing a normal job that at some point in time, you'd have to break off, go to the gym, work out then at some point during the day and everybody's schedule kind of changes through the day. But later in the day, you'll go pit practice, then you'll go back and do your job. So it's kind of a two part job, you know, working in the shop as well as changing tires. But you do the practice during the day, then sometimes we did two a days, a lot of football guys, then for the most part, it was one a day. Go back to work. And, uh, the hard days for us was actually the weekends, right? So, uh, most of my career I was on the road crew and the pit crew. So I flew out on Wednesday or Thursday, and I'd work on the car during the actual race weekend. And when Sunday would come around, I'd change tires. But, at points in my career, I was just a tire changer. Worked in the shop and that consisted of getting up at two o'clock on Sunday morning To go over to the airport climb on one of our private planes to fly us wherever across the country we was going Land up wherever we was going about the time the Sun got up go to the racetrack set the pit box up Do our pre race routine get ready for the race by the time the race started you've been up for 9 or 10 hours already, then you're expected to go out, do a good job, then, uh, get finished with the race, tear down, fly home, get home at 2 o'clock in the morning and be back at work at 7 the next morning.

Jason Yocum:

Help out the crowd a little bit here, Mike, over that, uh, decorated 25 years of doing various tasks there on the NASCAR circuit. What was the names of some of the drivers you worked for? I believe I know one, but I'm going to let you tell me rather than be wrong to the audience.

Mike Lingerfelt:

Yeah, so I'll start out with, you know, I don't count a few of the years for the simple fact that It wasn't cup racing. So I count the cup years, but I started out with Marty Ward, uh, in South Carolina, then, uh, Shane Hall, Jason Keller. Then whenever I moved to cup, I went with RCR with Skinner and Earnhardt, Chance Tarzell Skinners, um, spent three years doing that. Left, went to Gibbs, spent five years with Tony Stewart on the 20 car, left, went to Roush, Yates, which it. Which is commonly known now, but it was Yates at the time. Spent three years on the 38 with Elliot Sadler. Left there, went to the 48 for five of the best years of my life with the 48 with Jimmy Johnson. Left there and went to Roush and pretty much worked for everybody that was in the building at Roush over that time. And you know, it sounds like you move around a lot, but we're We're no different than some of the football guys. Everybody runs on contracts. So, you work on a, you sign up for a three year contract, and sometimes they extend it. At the end of your three years, you might find a better contract somewhere else, and it makes sense for you and your family to go move and change jobs. So, you know, you stay anywhere about three years, as long as you both like each other. Then, if the contract warrants it, you Extended a couple of years. If it don't, you find them the next best contract you can find for yourself and just kind of bounce around a little bit. Toolboxes have wheels for a reason.

Nick Williams:

Who was your favorite race team or what was your favorite race team that you worked for?

Mike Lingerfelt:

You know, everybody, every team has something fantastic about it, right? Um, RCR up at Childress's and Yates for the family aspect. Great human beings, great people to work for, loved every minute of it. Um, obviously, with Tony Stewart and Jimmy Johnson, you win a lot of races, you win a lot of championships. And, um, you just get to see a different perspective from the different teams. You know, so all of them have great things about them that, um, That makes it the best, even though it's hard to put your hand on just one is, man, this is the absolute best thing ever in the free world. You just can't do just one team.

Jason Yocum:

Yeah, that's cool. You've been with some of the highest end, uh, there, uh, Tony Stewart is kind of a Hoosier. Uh, the dirt track that he started out many years ago is actually about 20 miles from where we're kind of doing this podcast. So that's a very good connection. Um,

Crystal Robertson:

So, uh, it sounds like in 25 years, you've had a lot of really cool experiences. What are some of your most memorable moments?

Mike Lingerfelt:

You know, obviously winning the Brickyard is huge for me. I've been fortunate enough to win the Brickyard five times. Wow. A couple of them stand out in general. You know, we was up here and, I think it was 2008 ish we had the little tire debacle and was having to pit every six laps, eight laps or whatever it was and we won that race based on pit stops and pit stops alone and that meant a lot. That was a really cool race to win, get to kiss the brakes again and that was a little emotional for me. Bristol's always emotional, especially when the crowds was in Bristol and you had 400, 000 people stuffed in a half mile It was really cool to win Bristol. Anytime you won, I was fortunate enough to win there. Four or five times

Jason Yocum:

I think folks is on the brickyard man. That's really cool to see You know Penske's done a lot of work on there and he's making it more of an experience So I'm super proud of that, you know looking at that track the historic lore of it Kind of restoring the roar and making it more of a community of them You know hundreds of thousands of people and kind of beefing it out. Nick's gonna talk to you a question as well

Nick Williams:

Did you I know you you were saying that you know There's really no way to to say what your favorite race team was But do you have a favorite track? I mean, and you don't have to say uh, You don't have to say Indy. Just cause, you know.

Mike Lingerfelt:

I can promise you Indy is not my favorite track. It's my favorite, one of my favorite tracks to win at. But Indy's huge. Um, The way it's laid out, You don't get a lot of air flow. Downpit Road at Indy and When we're up there the time of year they bring us in there is hotter than Hades in there So Indy is not my favorite place to go You know, I really really like Bristol just for a simple fact that when they stuff that place full of people And they're doing, they always do God bless America before the Star Spangled Banner. And when they do that, when it's a hundred percent packed, it makes your heart skip a beat. I bet. Because it's so loud in there. That's cool.

Jason Yocum:

I think the NASCAR always respects our country and I really appreciate that. You know, very similar to fishing, you know, they do the, they do the Star Spangled Banner and then they kind of do that. So I think that's good. So walk us through just a little bit about the transition between that lifestyle and the. The general manager of the boat dealerships. Uh, I know you from fishing more than I do the NASCAR circuit. I've gained, you know, um, friendship with you over the years, but walk us through a little bit about what maybe a day to day ops looks like for you right now on your, um, I know it's more than nine to five, but we'll call it a nine to five.

Mike Lingerfelt:

Yeah. You know what? Honestly, what the transition that happened was I got injured again. Obviously, um, we're coming up on a pretty big anniversary for me. Uh, for injuries. I've got injured a few times changing tires. February 20th of 2000, I broke my femur at Daytona. Uh, then I've tore some tendons off the bone and this and that. Um, the last injury was a shoulder injury. And it kind of put me to the point where I couldn't change tires anymore. And I was to the point where it would be a good time for a change. And the only thing I knew other than race cars, was Was people and boats. So it was a good transition for me So now I GM two boat dealerships here in the Charlotte region We carry eight lines and we're do a lot with a little we're a very small family owned dealership, but we do a lot and I'm also the service manager, the sales manager, and the GM. So I wear a lot of hats. Um, I wish it was a 9 to 5. But it's, uh, I said it unlikely, I'm

Jason Yocum:

just establishing the full time position, but yeah, you know, as well as I do, that's probably more like a 5 to 8, or what, you know, different hours, different days, different seasons, so I can appreciate that, absolutely.

Mike Lingerfelt:

Well, and this is a bad time of the year for us. We did the Mid Atlantic Boat Show last week here in Charlotte, and between Monday morning and Sunday night, I worked 99 hours. So, it's, uh, it's actually worse than racing for hours this time of year.

Nick Williams:

You mentioned, uh, you mentioned injuries and that was kind of what caused the transition. You don't, when you think of a pit crew, you don't really, you know, well, at least for, cause I'm not a huge racing person. So you don't really think about the pit crew getting, getting injured. So is that a real common thing? And what usually causes those injuries, just the takeoff of the, of the car? Or how does that work?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Um, you know, most of the time it is, We only get to leave pit wall one stall before our car gets there. Um, and it varies, the length of the pit stall varies from racetrack to racetrack and the speed at which they're coming in varies racetrack to racetrack from 35 mile an hour to 65. And at the most you get about 35 feet to jump out in front of it running 65 mile an hour. And if the driver misjudges where he's stopping or locks or breaks up, the next thing you know, you're on the hood, over the roof. Laying out there on the ground.

Jason Yocum:

Hey, educate me real quick here. So if I'm coming into Indy, you know, we don't want to go always back to that track, but we're familiar with that track. So your racer comes in, he's pitting, what is considered a stud, um, exit time at a racetrack like Indy? Because that, I think that gives a perspective because very good question by Nick, but I'm curious to see how you're going to answer that.

Mike Lingerfelt:

Um, actual pit stop time. So, it's changed so much over the years for the fact that, um, we was doing four tire pit stops with seven people, four tires, 18 gallon of fuel. We was getting them down in the high nines, low 10 second range, uh, with five lug nuts. So then they tried to slow us down and they made the wheel studs longer. So you had to have a thread showing and you couldn't use your hand speed and that kind of backed them up to the mid 12s and Then they started taking people away to slow us down that moved it to 13s Then we got them back down into the 12s then now there went to one lug nut in the cup series With less people and it's got it back down into the tens and elevens now.

Nick Williams:

Why would they want to slow you guys down?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Well, I'm not in NASCAR anymore, so I don't have to be politically correct It's uh, it's money motivated, right so you get you get stud athletes With good hand eye coordination and it becomes a bit more and you want to hire the best people you can for your pit crew so You know, there's only so many really really top notched number 10 athletes out there that can do it So it become a bit more and they was having to pay the tire changers and tire carriers and Jackman more and more and more So the owners would complain And then they'd try to make rules to slow us down. So it would kind of level the plan filled out to where a guy that was an eight and not a 10 could get the job done in the same amount of time and the owners and the teams could save money.

Jason Yocum:

I think if you look at multiple sports, like there's, there's debates out there, but I think the ball and baseball for instance, was more lively than it ever has been because the, you know, the stitches are always the same. The weight's the same, you know, as well as I do. I think the home run ball is kind of what everybody's looking at to switch sports for you. If I can switch one more sport with you here. So your, um, your passion for fishing developed. How do you find it complements your professional life with you already having success on the track? How does that translate over to the water, whether it be freshwater or salt?

Mike Lingerfelt:

You know, the fishing is more, you know, I enjoy it. It's a lot of therapy for me, especially when I was racing. Um, when I go out and play fish, it was the entertainment that just let me relax, chill out, have a good time fishing. Uh, the tournament side of me when I'd fish the tournaments was just the same as when I was on pit road. I wanted to do the best I could, fish as hard as I could, and uh, Just give it everything I had for however many hours they let me fish for a tournament, but now I don't do as many tournaments With my shoulder. I can't fish hard for eight hours straight right now So I'm I'm more into play fishing right now and whether it be saltwater or freshwater, you know I get a fish Norman anytime I want to it's 35 foot behind my house

Jason Yocum:

That's a real fishery there, man. In Indiana, it's tough. Um, the waters are tough, but I think a perspective that I want to share with the audience here and kind of correlating it ironically to your day there on the NASCAR circuit is, you know, you're waking up, you know, I personally wake up 2. 30 in the morning, drive a couple hundred miles. You're in a boat to eight to 10 hours, you know, you're dehydrated, you're fighting through, uh, you're making some stuff happen. And at the end of the day, it's kind of, that's, that's your goal and expectation. And then you have kind of the one. The winding down, the driving home, the getting back home. So, although a lot of different stressors, still very hard on the body, you're very tired. Uh, you don't get immediate injuries, I don't think, in fishing, but you know, as well as I do, if you're casting, you know, 75, times during the year, that shoulder and elbow is eventually going to bother you and everything, so. You can definitely, uh, definitely see that. Talk to me a little bit about the high pressure environment that you have. Um, maybe let's say, let's say you're trying to make up time or you're coming to the end or you're trying to win a point scenario or standing, uh, talk to us a little bit about that on the NASCAR side.

Mike Lingerfelt:

So the, the biggest thing about the high pressure side of it, it was extremely high pressure. You know, I was fortunate where I kind of had a switch. I could be standing on pit road, hanging out with you, talking, laughing, carrying on. Then when it's time to do my job, I could just flip a switch, get up on the wall and go do it. Um, I never let the pressure really get to me. Um, but there's obviously lots of pressure in it. Everybody in the shop, the road crew, the pit crew, the shop crew, everybody relies on the guys over the wall to do a good job. Because those 400 people plus that work at the shop every week with the multi car teams, they have no control over if you suck or not. So if you go out there and you have a bad day and you suck, you directly affected those 400 people in the shop as well with their bonus, with the wind, with everything. So that's, that's where I felt the most pressure wasn't actually doing the job. You could do the job. Because you practice so much. It's like second nature. The pit stop itself is easy. You know, it's the The snipers that come out and hit you during the pit stop that Make you screw up. You don't go out there and screw up for fun. You know, everybody makes mistakes But we're graded on a stop by stop basis and you're always expected to be perfect But if you can if you play baseball and hit a 300 you're gonna be in Hall of Fame And we bet a 300, you're looking for a job. I was

Jason Yocum:

gonna say you're a free agent.

Crystal Robertson:

Do you have any like rituals that you do before going out to a race to like kind of like get pumped up? Like music or workouts or?

Mike Lingerfelt:

You know, I was actually the opposite. I was chilled. Um, you have plenty of guys around you that had their big headphones on. Um, Pumping herself up, smacking herself in the face, jumping off pit wall, waving her arms. So you're just like

Crystal Robertson:

meditating?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Yeah, they look like they're on pre workout right before the pit stop. They're jumping around like you think they, you think they got stung by a bee in the ass or something. The way they're jumping around trying to get warmed up. You're like man, What's that called? Is that called

Nick Williams:

speed? No, I'm just playing. What do you miss the

Crystal Robertson:

most about NASCAR?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Um, honestly, I don't miss a whole lot about it other than the competition. Yeah. You know, I miss, I miss the competition. I miss doing the pit stops. Um, I miss a few of the people. Um, but I really, I really just miss the competition. And that was, uh, that's one of the things that drove me as hard as it did for as many years because the average lifespan of a tire changer, you know, for doing that career is only about seven years. So, I had a few careers built into one. So, you know, I just,

Nick Williams:

So you're really enjoying the, the boat dealership thing. You seem like, you seem like the kind of guy I'd want to buy a boat from. I mean, you seem pretty genuine and laid back and you know, so is that, is that kind of your, your groove now?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Yeah. I mean, I still do my dirt racing stuff. I grew up racing dirt cars. So when I want the excitement side of it, I'll go run the dirt car stuff and kind of still get a little bit of racing in me. Then the boat side, um, I know boats and I know people, you know, so it's easy for me to go in and get my guys motivated to do a good job and, and be a team player and everybody pulling in the same direction. We sell really nice boats. It's easy to, they're easy to sell. They sell their self, you know, so it's just a matter of putting the right people in the right seat of a boat. And it's really. Really enjoyable because any point in time during the day that I want to I can pretty much go out on a lake and do a test drive. Oh, there you go. Yeah, that's a better test drive than a car.

Nick Williams:

Well, we talked a

Crystal Robertson:

lot about your career. What do you do for fun?

Nick Williams:

Besides fish. Yeah, besides fishing.

Crystal Robertson:

Like, what do you do for fun that we would never guess?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Honestly, I'm pretty damn bored. I'm not, if I'm not working or fishing, um, I fish a lot in the Keys. So that's kind of my entertainment. I don't, I don't really count Norman as my entertainment fishing. I really enjoy saltwater fishing. So I fly down to Florida. We got a spot in the Keys. So I fly down there a few weekends during the winter, especially when it's cold here. And saltwater fish. We do stone crab, blue crab traps, so I get a little bit of, I get a little bit of something that you can't do here. So that's kind of my entertainment. I really don't

Crystal Robertson:

Do they have, uh, soft shell crabs down there?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Some of the blue crabs Actually, they do molter shells, so you can find some soft shells, but they're few and far between.

Jason Yocum:

That's interesting. Just so the crowd knows, um, I have a topwater fishing company called, uh, Boy Lures, and uh, Mike, that's kinda how we know each other, kinda started our, uh, friendship, we kinda knowin each other. Um, So, um, So, um, That's actually a saltwater lure, as you well know, and it's also a freshwater lure. What do you feel like, um, like what are you, what are you kind of thinking? What are you targeting maybe when you're saltwater fishing or the brack water? I'm really jealous when people get to do that because we're all freshwater in the midwest, but how does that look a little bit different from the freshwater setup?

Mike Lingerfelt:

So, uh, literally when you get up in the morning, you could look at the weather and figure out what you want to fish for. If, if it's blowing out of the west and you're thinking about going fish, you're not going to go fish the bay side because it's going to be blowing across the bay. You can run out front and you can either get on the hook out at the reef line and catch some yellowtail snapper, some triggerfish, mackerel, grouper if they're in season. If you want to get out and troll around if the wind's blowing a little bit harder. And you don't want to be on the hook and get you feel like you're in a washing machine all day You can uh, you can troll around catch some mahi, sell fish High speed troll for wahoo so You can pretty much target what you're going to go after based off the weather Then if it's blowing out of the east and you're going to get the absolute Guts beat out of you. You can go out in the backwater and catch trout, mangrove snappers You can go out there and if you want to catch something big, go shark fish, go tarpon fish If you got a bay boat, you can go catch snap, uh, snook Stuff like that, but so there's so many options, you know, if you go if I go out back here on Norman I'm either gonna go for spotted bass, largemouth bass, and you can't target either one really here Because the way this lake's set up, or you can go catch one of the, we got blue cats, channel cats, fly heads, which you're going to target those if you go, uh, we got alligator gar. And a bunch of different sunfish. Aren't

Crystal Robertson:

those the ones with the weird long pointy nose? Yeah, they have

Jason Yocum:

the real long

Mike Lingerfelt:

teeth. Do y'all eat them up here? No. We

Jason Yocum:

don't, but I've messed with them before and ironically people say that they put rope on their hooks to catch those. I didn't know they were

Crystal Robertson:

edible.

Jason Yocum:

Yeah, because they get that tooth wrapped around that rope and they just can't pull off of it. So if you put a little section of rope on there. Just go noodling. We

Mike Lingerfelt:

go out. We go out and we'll go out and bow fish and catch

Nick Williams:

catfish and go,

Mike Lingerfelt:

uh, no. She was from Pennsylvania and she would fish a little, but now she is turned into, uh, she gets to fish more days a year than I do now. Uh, so she's, uh, she's very fortunate to where she's, she's on the boat today. She was fishing today.

Nick Williams:

I could probably ask Jason the same question, but what was the, uh, what's the most memorable experience that you had, that you've had in your, uh, in your fishing tenure? I mean like whether it be danger or just like the craziest fish you caught, I mean like what would, what would you say is the most memorable moment, maybe you've fallen out of a boat?

Jason Yocum:

Let me help you a little bit on the, let me help that question a little bit. I really like that question, Mike. Um, talk to us about what's a big largemouth bass or a big spot there, because in Indiana, man, those fish are on steroids there compared to our biggest fish here. Uh, start there with uh, with your home lake, fresh water. Sure.

Mike Lingerfelt:

So, you know, if you want to go here and catch spotted bass, you can go out there and catch a hundred two pound bass at any point in time, pretty much any time of the year. But, to go out and catch the four pound, six pound, uh, we have had a seven this year, but we don't get huge, huge bass. The, the water temp here and the oxygen level in the lake really just don't, it's not conducive to get really, really big hogs here, but you catch a lot of fish and you can go up the river and catch more largemouth and on the south end, but you can we'll have 20 pound bags win about every tournament. During a weekday here. And you can have a tournament pretty much every day of the week here and somebody's going to have a 20 pound bag. You're not going to have a 50 pound bag but you'll have a 20 any time you want one.

Nick Williams:

Back to the racing, just real quick, if somebody wanted to, let's say you had a 12, 13 year old kid that their aspiration was to be in a pit crew one day, what would you tell someone that was wanting to start out or get into that industry, and also would you encourage that?

Mike Lingerfelt:

It's a great industry to be in. It's a hard industry to get into is the problem. Um, more and more of the pit crew guys are being recruited out of colleges just for hand eye coordination. Uh, they won't know anything about a race car. They won't know anything about a pit stop, but they'll find guys that kind of have the right build, uh, right mindset, right mentality, and they'll teach them how to do a pit stop, but they won't be car oriented. So interesting. So a lot of people don't understand pit stops and the breakdown of the pit stops, right? So a few years ago, I was fortunate enough to be picked out of seven people in the world to be in a commercial for Jagermeister. So they flew seven of us to Prague to film a commercial for a brotherhood that they picked one person from every aspect of a sport. that they wanted to pick. So they picked myself from NASCAR. They picked Keeson Johnson from football, Rob Smets from PBR, bullfighting, Nathan Fletcher, big wave surfer, Freddie Roach, who was Manny Pacquiao's trainer, Mr. Cartoon, uh, Mark Matrado, that's a famed tattoo artist in, uh, California, and, uh, Kerry King from Slayer. So we used all those scores together.

Crystal Robertson:

That's random.

Mike Lingerfelt:

And, uh, So if you want to go look it up, it's called Jagermeister's Seat at the Table and in my backstory of that, I actually break down a pit stop second by second and tell everybody about how hot the tires are, how hot the brakes are, how long it takes us to do every aspect of a pit stop in the backstory. It's a short backstory, I mean it's only a few minutes long, but that's one of the things that I did in the backstories, just break it down and, and kind of give the intricacies of what it takes to do the pit stop. Cause we hit five lug nuts in 0. 8 seconds, less than a second. She had five lug nuts. That's crazy. And most people don't, don't understand that.

Nick Williams:

I'll look that up and make sure we get that put on here. Cause that's, that's, yeah, that's really

Jason Yocum:

cool. Yeah. We'll add that. That's kind of a, to be recognized. I mean, that's a super honor with, with, Awesome people from all over the sports world and industry. I think this has been uh, this has been fun for us, Mike I appreciate you being patient with us, you know as we go on and we advance, you know We want you to be a part of it Uh, we'd be blessed if you have anybody, uh that you would like, you know to see On, or maybe do a follow up, you know, on down the road, but any, any, any last things you'd like to say, uh, to kind of wrap up with the Mosaic Binds podcast.

Mike Lingerfelt:

No, I appreciate y'all having me on. I had a great time and I'd be more than happy to come on again. I got plenty of friends. I'd love to come on. I just had. Ishmael row, walk out the door here. He was here in town today. And so we got, I got plenty of fishing friends. I got plenty of band friends, anything y'all want to talk about. I got people for you

Jason Yocum:

and I don't want to bite myself down, but if I'm ever down there in the area, we're just all

Crystal Robertson:

going to go and just do the podcast from there. We'll just

Nick Williams:

do a day of, uh, test drives and just

Mike Lingerfelt:

do some window shopping in the boat dealership. You gotta be careful coming here. I got a bar in the basement.

Nick Williams:

Oh, okay. Okay.

Crystal Robertson:

All right. I'm, I'll be on Expedia tonight. I'm looking

Jason Yocum:

at plane tickets. Mike, you did a nice job, man. I, I, I was in broadcasting. You've done more of these than I have. You've traveled more than I have, but I'm kind of getting back into it. And, uh, you were a very good, uh, first or any guest for us because you were just easy to talk to. Um, you expanded upon, you know, what you've done. You've done a lot of great things. Uh, we share that fish in commonality together. So if I can ever help you, uh, if you need any custom stuff painted up, let me know. I want to do that as a token of appreciation, just for you taking time out of your busy schedule to, uh, allocate some time to spend with us here in Hoosier land. Okay. We do that for,

Nick Williams:

uh, for like living rooms and stuff like that. If I need any custom painting done, can you, I can't do that. Okay. Fine. All right. We try. Hey, thanks a lot, Mike. I appreciate it, man. You you're welcome. Anytime. I appreciate

Mike Lingerfelt:

y'all having me on. I had a great time. Anytime you want to follow up and have another one, I'm in. I love talking. I

Jason Yocum:

think we'd like to have a mini just on that experience that you had. And then I'll let you go after that. But I, I, I think that would be a cool segment, you know, for a mini, uh, segment for it. And, uh, kind of go from there. With the Jägermeister, she's a table, yeah, I think so too. Yeah,

Mike Lingerfelt:

that's a huge story because, so, They contacted me and they didn't tell me anybody else was in the commercial. It was all top secret. You had to sign up for it, sign the NDAs, hold on yards. Um, we're in Daytona about this time of year, or maybe it was spring. I can't remember. It was, it was a spring race. Uh, when, uh, Juan Pablo hit the jet dryer. When he, uh, hit the jet dryer, we was already delayed, then he hit the jet dryer, and, uh, the race kept getting delayed, delayed, and delayed. And I was supposed to be on a flight to Prague the next morning. Well, our private plane got grounded because of fog. So I had to climb in the transporter of another team. And I rode in a transporter from Daytona to Charlotte. They dropped me off on the side of the road. My wife picked me up, took me to the airport. We barely made the flight to Prague, get to Prague. Limo picks me up, takes me to the photo, or the uh, shooting location. And I walk in, everybody's just happy I finally made it. Because I was a full day late. Because the race was delayed. And she's like, I'm late. What can I get you? I was like, I just need a shower. So I took, I took a shower, uh, cause I left straight from the racetrack, never stopped moving and went straight to Prague. So I get a shower and we go in to start filming. And that's when I see Rob Smith. And I've known Rob for years through, uh, when. I was at RCR, they was a big PBR bull riding affiliation with Wrangler and everything else with Childress and that whole program. And I met Rob like 20 years before that. So, I was excited to see Rob, then everybody else was kind of a new acquaintance for me. So we filmed the whole deal, had a great time, uh, drank a lot of Jager. We tried to kill each other. It's part of

Jason Yocum:

the perk there. We wanna give you a last opportunity as a show of appreciation for being on the show. Uh, maybe a, um, maybe a last. Uh, plug for you, if you will, maybe give a little bit, uh, information in 30 seconds or a minute about where your boat dealership is, how we can contact you via social media, kind of give you a platform to kind of throw on if you've got a

Nick Williams:

website, if you've got a

Mike Lingerfelt:

website or how, how do you want people to find you, Mike? Thank you all. Um, I'm actually getting back on social media a little bit more than I have been in the past. Uh, everything's Mike Lingerfeld, whether it be Twitter, Instagram. Um, I do have a Facebook page I'm never on, but I had to have it for, uh, for the Jaeger stuff. But, um, I'm trying to get more back on social media and kind of keep in touch with some of the people that I hadn't seen in years. And, uh, and kind of give an update on more what I'm doing. Cause I just, once I got hurt, um, I just kind of fell off the face of the earth until I was healed up enough to where I wanted to talk, to tell anybody what I was doing.

Nick Williams:

So, so Twitter and Instagram, those are your, your best, best ways to, um, follow you?

Mike Lingerfelt:

Yeah, and I'm gonna get better at posting. I'm horrible at it right now, but I'm gonna get back on the horse and start posting some more fish pictures. Well, hey, again, we appreciate you

Nick Williams:

being on here, and we'll definitely have you back.

Mike Lingerfelt:

Yeah, thank you. It was a lot of fun. Perfect. I appreciate it. Y'all stay warm up there. As we try to. Taiwan is to you, Mike. Thanks, Mike. Thank you. Thank you.