Mosaic Minds Podcast

Episode 3 | The Fishing Tetris Champion | Interview W/ Co-Host Jason Yocum

February 27, 2024 Mosaic Minds Media/Jason Yocum Season 1 Episode 3
Episode 3 | The Fishing Tetris Champion | Interview W/ Co-Host Jason Yocum
Mosaic Minds Podcast
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Mosaic Minds Podcast
Episode 3 | The Fishing Tetris Champion | Interview W/ Co-Host Jason Yocum
Feb 27, 2024 Season 1 Episode 3
Mosaic Minds Media/Jason Yocum

Today, we're interviewing our co-host, Crystal Robertson.  Crystal shares her interests and what she's about.  Crystal has been married for 17 years, has 2 kids, and 76 tattoos!  In this episode, you can learn about the First Lady of Mosaic Minds Podcast.

Jason's Instagram:  boinglures
Jason's Facebook: boinglures

Check out Mosaic Minds' Video Podcast: mosaic.minds.podcast
TikTok: mosaic.minds.podcast
Instagram: mosaic.minds.podcast
LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/company/mosaic-minds-podcast
Facebook: mosaicmindspodcast
X (Twitter): mosaic_podcast

Website: mosaicmindspodcast.com

Contact us for booking and show ideas: mosaicminds37@gmail.com

Show Notes Transcript

Today, we're interviewing our co-host, Crystal Robertson.  Crystal shares her interests and what she's about.  Crystal has been married for 17 years, has 2 kids, and 76 tattoos!  In this episode, you can learn about the First Lady of Mosaic Minds Podcast.

Jason's Instagram:  boinglures
Jason's Facebook: boinglures

Check out Mosaic Minds' Video Podcast: mosaic.minds.podcast
TikTok: mosaic.minds.podcast
Instagram: mosaic.minds.podcast
LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/company/mosaic-minds-podcast
Facebook: mosaicmindspodcast
X (Twitter): mosaic_podcast

Website: mosaicmindspodcast.com

Contact us for booking and show ideas: mosaicminds37@gmail.com

Jason Yocum:

So we had two headed cattle, um,

Nick Williams:

Two headed, hold on, two headed cattle? Two head of cattle. Okay. All right. Like now I really have to check out this farm. There you

Jason Yocum:

go. Very interesting farm.

Nick Williams:

Welcome

Jason Yocum:

to mosaic minds,

Nick Williams:

the podcast where every episode is

Jason Yocum:

a colorful blend of perspectives, ideas, and conversations.

Nick Williams:

Each week, our diverse team of hosts brings their unique backgrounds, experiences, and interests to the table. Mosaic minds is your invitation to join the conversation, to see the world through a kaleidoscope of viewpoints. So grab a seat, tune in, and let the Mosaic unfold before you. Welcome to Mosaic Minds. Uh, I'm Nick and to my right here is the first lady of our podcast. This is Crystal. And then straight ahead, straight in front of me is Jason Yoakum. And he, I think he's the only one who just gave her last name. Just, just in full transparency, Williams Robertson. Today, we're going to be interviewing Jason Yoakum. Jason, tell us a little bit about

Jason Yocum:

yourself. First off, glad to be here. Uh, glad to be back in the broadcasting game after some years. So married, uh, live in central Indiana. I like to play sports and I like to stay competitive. So that's the basis of most of the questions I'm going to answer for you today.

Nick Williams:

Okay. Tell us a little, well, you also have a business, so tell us a little bit about your, um, your lure business

Jason Yocum:

that you have. I do. So, uh, Boing Lures is a fishing lure company. It's a low and high pitch frequency sounding lure. It's kind of got a built in sonar, if you will, on the water. Got to travel all over the country, talk about it, meet some fishermen and women all over the country. And it's a. It's been a nice initiative to have you fish with them yourself. I do love to fish with them first thing in the morning to about lunchtime. Every term that's sweet. If I can.

Nick Williams:

Nice. All right. Well, so guys, so I am just kind of random, but I believe you said that you'd won some kind of a national, I'm pretty sure you told me at work, you won some kind of national Tetris tournament at some point. So what, what happened with that? Tell me about that. Kind

Jason Yocum:

of launched the initiative. Uh, when I was younger, like in a play, me and my dad would play on a PC computer. This particular tournament, there was 125, 000 people in it, competed a Friday night to a Sunday night. So about a 72 hour tournament, and, uh, did very well. Uh, actually won the tournament, acquired more points than anybody else, spent a lot of hours playing, and, uh, opened up some levels that the typical player wouldn't normally see.

Crystal Robertson:

So, when you are playing in the tournaments, is there a special strategy that you adhere

Jason Yocum:

to? I do. Uh, the strategy is, is, that's a great question. So, you can either do one of two things. So, you can build it up to where you have many Tetrises, which is four lines with one move built up. Or you can rapid fire people. So I personally like to rapid fire people. I used to have a

Nick Williams:

boss that liked to rapid fire people. Nice. Nice. All right. So you're, you're a, obviously you're a big basket, big sports guy, big basketball guy. Um, as a child, what age were you first introduced to basketball? Cause I know that's been kind of a core of, of your life

Jason Yocum:

growing up. I get cold chills talking about this in Northern Indiana, but on a barn dad put up his first goal. There was about four feet high on the side of a barn. In grass at about two and a half to three years old. So I can remember that was one of my finest moments as a child is taking my first shots on my own, my own island at goal.

Nick Williams:

Right on. So, um, would you, didn't you say something about, uh, it was on a farm or you were telling me it was on a farm

Jason Yocum:

or. Yeah, so it was a farm, but we wouldn't consider ourselves farmers, right? So we had two head of cattle. Wait,

Nick Williams:

hold on. Two headed cattle? Two head of cattle. Okay, all right. Like, now I really have to

Jason Yocum:

check out this farm. There you go. Very interesting farm. But, uh, we had, uh, two cattles. We, uh, two head of cattle. We had a, uh, potato patch that we had. We had pheasants, ducks, chickens, geese, turkeys. I'll stop there. Some farm cats and, um, just really enjoyed playing, being outside, being with the animals, playing basketball and, uh, in northern Indiana. That's kind of a way of

Nick Williams:

life. Did you eat any of these animals?

Jason Yocum:

Not the cats. We did. The most general story I'm going to give you is I had a cat, a cow that I really liked. His name was Justin. And I came home one day from school and Justin wasn't there in the pasture anymore. Years later, I found out that, uh, we were, we were served with some healthy farm raised

Nick Williams:

beef. Well, when you said cat first, I almost had a heart attack, sorry. I know, I was like, what? Poor

Jason Yocum:

Justin. Different species, right?

Nick Williams:

I love that there's a cow named Justin, though. How cool is that? Right? Yeah, this is Bessie. No, it's not. It's Justin.

Jason Yocum:

If you saw me today, I'm always relaxed. I've always got, like, sports clothes on and sweatpants and gym attire, but I had corduroy pants and a cowboy boot. You know, the Interesting belt buckle and stuff like that. So that was, uh, that was interesting growing up like

Nick Williams:

that. Yeah, when in school we called those nut huggers. Yeah. Those, uh, farmer jeans. There you go. So did your other animals have, like, regular people names? Like Benjamin and Uh, my

Jason Yocum:

sister had a cat that was named Truman Capote. I thought that was interesting.

Nick Williams:

Well, I know you're besides sports. I know that you're overall a really competitive guy, you know, I see it at work all the time. So being a competitive guy, describe how you like to compete and operate when it comes to sports. What does that look like?

Jason Yocum:

I think work is the format that I'll speak on first. So at work, it's, uh, it's gaining the knowledge of the professionals that are in your position, appreciating that the demographics are different. The people are different. The T uh, the face of the teams are different. However, you're still competing for X metrics and, uh, really taking pride in your craft, getting better, uh, honing your skills and always just wanting to succeed and let other people succeed with you. So it's more of a, we focus on it as an eye focus, and that helps us grow as a campus. It galvanizes the team. And quite frankly, it allows us to compete on a national level.

Nick Williams:

Yeah, I get the competitive thing. I said, I'd never do a job that I couldn't. At least have the potential to be the best at, you know, like if I knew I, there's no way I could ever reach that I would lose interest

Jason Yocum:

us working together. You know, you do great on that side and you'll, you'll get to talk on your segment, but it's just nice having someone else that's competitive and, uh, you know, all 3 of us are competitive in the fields. We have, we all want to succeed and. We all want to get first place, but what I understand is we all want to have integrity when we get first place, you know, you can be in second place as long as you do it with a goodwill and intention.

Nick Williams:

Well, it sounds like you, uh, you're a talented guy. What kind of talents do you wish that you have that you don't?

Jason Yocum:

Ironically, uh, the two talents that are, um, co guests here, um, we'll talk a little bit about. First one I'm going to strive for is artistic ability. Um, I draw, you know, I'm mid forties, but I draw like a second or third grader. I'm a stick figure type guy. I have no artistic talent, but when I see the color and the line work and the tattoo work specifically, or I see a real, um, ancient drawing or a sketch, I just really wish I had that talent, but you could literally do a color by number and I'd somehow mess it up. I'm just Atrocious at it, but I appreciate that. And then on the music side, it's not an eye hand coordination thing because sports is a natural balance of that, but it's more of a, um, the singing and the playing of a guitar or vice versa, or any instrument for that matter. I'm just, uh, not overly, um, proficient at it, nor would I really learn just because I would want to be very good, very quickly, and I know that can be hard. Sometimes.

Nick Williams:

Yeah, it's definitely, definitely takes some time. Is it the coordination thing? Like, is it the, because I mean, being in sports, I would think that being able to sing and play the guitar at the same time. It's kind

Jason Yocum:

of an overload. I would liken it to a three pointer or free throw when everybody's watching and you got to make that last free throw just in 30 seconds to answer that question. But I'm going to look for the hole in the ground, right? That the janitors put a nail hole in the middle. I'm going to find that big toe. I'm going to put it right on the line. I'm going to take three dribbles. I'm going to take a deep breath. And I'm going to shoot with ice water veins and make that shot when you're looking at guitarists in my opinion There's certain bands that have easy riffs. There's bands that have very complex riffs It would be very hard to be diversified because I'm just the type guy that can memorize one thing muscle memory it And go as opposed to have to learn many styles and dictations along the music spectrum. Who's your favorite band growing up? Um, artist, if I could, I'm going to answer that a little differently. I'm a Woodstock era guy. If I could go back to that era of music, I think that that era of music is phenomenal. Uh, childhood. I listened to a lot of like a green day, smashing pumpkins, uh, Metallica, white zombie was kind of my four most recognizable, but you like,

Nick Williams:

you like, like, uh, Uh, Jimi Hendrix and the Grateful Dead and like

Jason Yocum:

that kind of absolutely Ritchie Havens, Jefferson Airplane. I just like that. I like that era of music when it was just about singing an expression as opposed to like commercializing it and kind of butchering the sound

Nick Williams:

down. Right. So Jason, who would you say has made the biggest impact in your life?

Jason Yocum:

Let me think about that for just a second. So, um, I think my mom and my dad, um, the career aspect that I'm going to give is. And our family, we have approximately 80, 85, maybe as many 90 years just off the top of my head in some form of administration on a high school or college level. So, when I was 6 years old, I was in my dad's classroom, helping go through some stuff, trying to be the best mentor I could for some of the children that he taught along with mom as well. She taught on the adult level. My sister teaches primarily on the high school level, and then I've done primarily the college level. So, the biggest influence professionally for me was them. Watching them get up every day, putting the armor on, seeing the best in people, wanting to see people succeed. And then being at the grocery store and having your last name called across aisle 13, when you're, you know, picking up something for the Superbowl. And he taught, he taught, um,

Nick Williams:

special education, correct? Yes. Okay. At a high

Jason Yocum:

school level, mom was more the adult level. So she was teaching life skills, like how to pay bills. How to operate day to day and, uh, kind of be a normal, um, member out in the local Kroger's, you know, be able to make change and, uh, kind of operate day to day. Like almost

Nick Williams:

like a home ec. Yes. Okay. Cool. Well, you mentioned that you played a lot of sports with your dad as a kid. What sports specifically did you play with him when you were growing

Jason Yocum:

up? Uh, very good question. So the list of sports I didn't play with him would probably be shorter than the list of sports I did play with him. But, uh, I was blessed because dad was a, um, a high school golf coach. So I was always playing golf. We had access to tennis courts, so I played a lot of tennis. I played baseball for a team. I played basketball for a team. He would take his Children and some family members and friends skiing in the winters. Um, I didn't personally play football, but I spent a lot of time on the football fields, watching him coach and going to the varsity practices. Um, we used to play ping pong a lot together. I'll stop there. There's just a lot of, uh, interesting games. Then in the winter, we would take the games inside with some broken windows and stuff. My mom always kind of got upset about, but it was, uh, it was interesting. Sports has always been a big part of my life.

Nick Williams:

Now, who won? Did you usually kick his ass or did he kick your ass?

Jason Yocum:

Um, I think when I was 13 or 14, I consistently beat him and I never turned back. But up until that time, he, he, he was a very good athlete. He played, uh, full court basketball until his low 50s, which I don't see how he does it, because I'm 45 and can barely jog up and down a court because I've been pretty hard on my body, but, uh, he was my inspiration to keep, keep doing what I do today and stay competitive and be in the sports environment. Did you guys talk trash? Oh, we did. He did. He was the funny trash talker. I'm the funny trash talker I'm not gonna say anything that's inappropriate But I'm gonna say stuff to get you to think that he really just say that to me and mess up for a couple minutes

Nick Williams:

On your end. Well, you have thicker skin than I do because that's why I stopped playing video games with my kids You know, like they'd be like dad you're trash

Jason Yocum:

You're trash. Kids these today are ruthless. I will say that were you as

Nick Williams:

high energy as a child as you are now

Jason Yocum:

Uh, Nick, you can appreciate this, but you only see about 20 percent of my energy, to be honest with you, and I think, I think that's a, uh, statement. The specific story I'll give you is, is I remember like it was yesterday, I would run around and just cause trouble outside and, uh, mom would literally come to the front and say, we got some brownies inside. Mom was great at making brownies, but. One out of two or three times, she didn't make brownies. That was just her way to get me inside,

Nick Williams:

wash up at night. Oh, that's so mean.

Jason Yocum:

And trick me to bring me inside. So I always remember that. And, uh, I remember when I used to get in trouble, she'd send me out to run sprints around the house four to six times. You know, run out to the mailbox and back to get the mail, just to wear me out enough. And I've, I've continued to have that type of energy, really, the rest of my life. Is that why you

Nick Williams:

have such a, uh, a fear of loss when it comes to brownies?

Jason Yocum:

Oh yeah. I can

Nick Williams:

put down some brownies. I

Jason Yocum:

could put down, you know, a half plate or so to this day because of it. So you

Nick Williams:

just got back, what was it, yesterday from a fishing tournament? Yeah. In Alabama?

Jason Yocum:

Is that right? Yeah, that's another one of my hobbies. Fishing to me is serenity. It's serenity. It's seeing bald eagles. It's seeing parts of the country you don't need to see. It's seeing a Bucky's. Truck stop and everybody likes to stop by and just kind of enjoy and laugh and see people. Yeah, so, uh, this weekend I left work on a Friday. Um, we drove about nine hours to, I don't know what part of Alabama, but I'll say Guntersville, kind of the mecca of fishing in the South, in my opinion. Uh, slept in a truck for about an hour and a half. After driving nine hours, fished for nine hours, drove home, got home about 2. 30 last night. Got some sleep and, uh, If we weren't doing something cool, which is what we're doing today with the podcast, I wouldn't be up, moving around. I'd be sick. So this is how important

Nick Williams:

it is to me to you I appreciate you, uh, gracing us with your presence, you know, noted.

Jason Yocum:

Vice versa. I wouldn't be here without you guys. You guys are awesome. Awesome to work with. How

Nick Williams:

often do you go to these tournaments? Cause I know you go pretty often. You go like all year or.

Jason Yocum:

I try to, we call it stealing time or chasing the sun. I try to, uh, go to the South, uh, for this year was my first tournament the earliest in the year. And then I'll fish all the way after, um, Thanksgiving. So I'll fish about 10, 10 and a half months this year.

Nick Williams:

Okay. What is it about fishing? Why are you so passionate about it? I guess.

Jason Yocum:

That's, that's a great question for a podcast. The reason I like that question is because I cannot fix anything. The wife knows it. The reason I fish is because I can be somewhat mechanical. I can take apart my equipment. I can put it back together. I can reline it. I can think about the conditions I have. Uh, you know, we're looking at, uh, your house and your infrastructure here and I couldn't hang those photos. I can't square anything off. I can't do any carpentry. I can't do any painting. I'll stop there because my wife would laugh at me, but she knows that I'll work hard all day, but I'm not gonna do a lot of perfectionist stuff. So the reason I fish is just to have fun. I feel like a man's man for a couple hours, you know. So there's probably,

Nick Williams:

there's probably a lot of stuff to it, a lot of stuff to it, but you, uh, it comes down to, you're, you're really good at it and that's why you like it.

Jason Yocum:

Really good is a relative term. I got stuff to learn, but I'm, I'm definitely far from a beginner, but I'm far from being the best I can be in my sport, but I compete, I get after it. I'm refreshed on a Monday and I really enjoy, you know, being out on the water and being there with a camaraderie of the other guys and ladies at fish. What do these tournaments look

Nick Williams:

like? Like, what, what is a day in the life

Jason Yocum:

of? Being around sports my whole life and competition, uh, there's nothing like fishing. When you have, uh, 450 men and women in an area about the size of two or three football fields that are all cruising around in the boat, talking trash, drinking coffee, standing for the national anthem, and then, um, I'll call it a redneck, but it's a redneck adventure, you know, we were boat number 156 and I would tell you 120 boats that went down the same path we're going on and you're driving 70 mile an hour, dodging waves, dodging boats, dodging traffic, cutting in front of people, racing people across that water. You know, you're almost frazzled by the time you get to your first spot. So that's kind of what it looks like. How do you

Nick Williams:

dodge a wave? Sounds like a good time though.

Jason Yocum:

You kind of dodged the waves because you don't want to spear him. I'm not the boat, uh, just to put it into perspective. I'm not the guy driving the boat. I'm the guy that looks over at you if you were driving the boat. And I said, I hope Nick's a safe driver because I've got to ride with him all day.

Nick Williams:

You haven't fallen out?

Jason Yocum:

I haven't fallen out, but I've been, uh, thrown off a seat probably 18 inches. And I had to hold on with all my Ooh, that'd be a painful landing, I don't think. I think I'll

Nick Williams:

pass on him doing any of that. Well, like, you

Jason Yocum:

know, like a chiropractor. Snap was probably the wrong term. Crack would have

Nick Williams:

been a better term. Crack it back in. His arm falls out of socket. And he's always like hitting it on something picturing with his spine. I

Jason Yocum:

wasn't like the cop from Terminator, you know, holding onto the back window, you know, trying to stay on and hold myself to the seat again or whatever, but a little bit of, a little bit of pain on the way to the first spot.

Nick Williams:

So cool. All right. Well, so this is, I don't think this is something that we'd talked about earlier, but you have just knowing you from, from work, you know, we've known each other for over a good year now, a year and a half, something like that. Right. So, um, you have this amazing ability from, I mean, I went and played pickleball with you and just. Knowing that we can go anywhere and you talk to anybody, but you can talk to anybody and you're one of the best networkers I've, I've ever met. So what would you say, what would you say is your secret behind that? Like, what is it? Do you just really love people or like, you know, what's your secret behind being able to talk to anybody? Joe Schmo sit next to you. The reason

Jason Yocum:

that I came on Mosaic Minds is because the general backgrounds that we have are so unique perspectives, but they all kind of mold together in the middle of the mosaic or the artwork, right? So, like the example I'm going to give you was a young lady checked me in. I had a pickleball bag when I was traveling, uh, recently and I forgot something. Well, she called me Mr. Pickleball on the way back and we got laughing and she plays. Um, what I try to do is I take the worlds of aviation, which is my, uh, job, obviously, you know, that I take very seriously, take a lot of pride in. Then I take fishing and pickleball. So my thing is, if I'm going to talk aviation, fishing and pickleball to you, chances are one of those three. Cross mosaics, if you will, with the others. The reason I enjoy talking to others is because I'm not anything special. I just so happen to have different hobbies than the two of you, for instance. So, I think the reason I like talking to people is to drive the camaraderie, find out what drives them, find out what makes them an excellent person, and not judging anybody regardless if you're on ESPN or throwing worms in the local park. Everybody's the same within the sports and activities that they like, and I just want to see the best in other people. I'm just a very Driven motivational person and like to see the best in others and have them get in front of Activities and avenues that they wouldn't normally pursue. So

Nick Williams:

what I'm hearing is, uh, you're curious. It's like, you're too curiosity. You just like to know about, cause I mean, I like people too, in general, you know, like in, in small portions, but I mean, I, it just depends on my mood and that's why, you know, I know we've talked about this before, but you being the director of admissions is why I couldn't do admissions because there's too many days where, you know, like I, I couldn't be on it cause you gotta be on it all the time, you know, you gotta always be a people person and I'm just not.

Jason Yocum:

Being a director, you have to use some humor and you can't ride a roller coaster. You gotta be just, you know, upbeat wanting to see people, but it's great to have that hard conversation with somebody would just say, you're messing up a little bit, man. You gotta, you gotta get back rocking in the same way because you're here for a, uh, you know, a specific reason to get out and get employed in the industry, you know, booming industry in the sports world. You're kind of looking for that guy that maybe needs to hear something to keep his athletic life alive. And that's what I had to do, you know, when I stopped playing basketball late thirties. I had to find other activities to keep my mind sharp and moving, stay competitive. And uh, that's what I've done with the activities that we'll talk about and get to learn a little bit out over the next weeks, months, years of the podcast.

Nick Williams:

Are you a people person, Crystal? Yes. Oh, you are? Oh yeah. So you can just go and go and go and you're fine. Like, Like, I like to be alone. So like, After being around people for a long time, I like to be alone and like decompress, but I'm good with being around people all day. Okay. And those are good people, you know,

Jason Yocum:

I could almost very well set on the good people. Yeah, I could almost

Nick Williams:

be a hermit. Like I could just, you know, like, well, I say that I say that, but like when COVID was happening and I had to work from home for a year, I didn't realize until I had to go back to the office that. How, you know, like how much social skills I've lost. Like I was like, uh, I found myself being weird with people because like I was home so long. I've like, it's like you forget how to communicate. Yeah, totally. You totally do. It's weird. And I don't want to lose that. Even if I don't like people. No, I do. I do. For the most part. I like, I like people. We have heard different talents that you have with sports and networking, um, but what is like something quirky or different, a talent that you have that most people wouldn't know that you have?

Jason Yocum:

Ironically, so I took broadcasting in school and I took business administration school, so ironically, an instructor of the business administration school said that I should go out on the motivational speaking trails and voiceover work are my two hidden talents in Quirky. So, like, I won't do it now. I'll save it for a later time, but I can do some interesting impersonations. The reason I'm going to say this, though, is because I was the go to person in high school that if anybody was having a bad day, I was the guy to cheer that person up, man, woman, old, young, it doesn't matter. I'll say anything at any time to anyone and keep a dead straight face. But more importantly, I can make that person laugh and come out of their shell. If they were depressed. At least they laughed for five minutes and then they went back to that depression. So that's my quirkiness. But that's also seeing the best in people. I don't want to see anybody down. I can attest

Nick Williams:

to that because he's, he'll come in and tell the driest joke with a straight face. The

Jason Yocum:

one I like to lose is when you're this lame you gotta come up with new material. So you're always looking for ways, angles, you know, names that sound familiar or, or You know, pronunciations that are spelled the same and things. And we're not

Nick Williams:

even talking about like dad jokes. We're talking about like, can you think of an example of, I can't think of one off the top of my head. I had a boss was really dry humor and like 90 percent of the people did not get his jokes, but I always thought it was funny.

Jason Yocum:

I call him deadpan humor. If you look it up, everybody knows what that is. And then my mom was big on puns. So like a play on words would be an example. I can't think of one off the top of my head. I'm trying to think

Nick Williams:

of one.

Jason Yocum:

Cause man, like one that would come to the top of my head would be like main street. Like, you know, the main street in town, you know, like everybody knows that that's the main street, right? But why would you say it's, you know what I mean? That would be an example. Why did you call it main street? Cause it's the main one in town. That's where

Nick Williams:

everything goes. No, I mean, I was saying, I was agreeing. So why would

Jason Yocum:

So yeah, yeah, yeah. So what you're saying is you're using humor and I missed it. So good job on that. Good work.

Nick Williams:

One thing I just thought of that you didn't mention that's definitely a talent of yours is Your ability to, uh, do extremely fast math, like we, like, you'll just, I'll be talking about something. You're like, Oh yeah, well, you know what? The percentage of that happening is 27. 7%.

Jason Yocum:

At work, we always got to be around percentages. We got to know our gross net packs, um, away from work, you know, you always got to know their percentage, you know, um, percentages came to me ironically, cause my dad would have, um, paper and plastic coins that he used in his classroom setting. And he would say like 30 and 68 cents, count that as soon as you can. The way that I'm good at that was baseball cards and that was, in other words, you got to count that 20 bill, the 10 bill, the ones and all the coins in rapid fire succession. And if you mess it up, dad would take the whole counting that I had done up to that point, take it away and make me start over. So not only do I have to be accurate and a perfectionist, I have to be quick. Like, you know, 15 out of 45 is 33. 3 percent would be an example, you know, you got to know that. So what I always do is I take it like if you took the next number that's close to that and then I already know that math and it's quick math on the other because I take, I take a lot of pride in meetings and numbers that I can get the answer for you quicker than the calculator. The calculator is going to tell you the exact answer, but if I can get within 1 or 2 percentage points, it ensures and instills in you confidence in me that I know the numbers. I know how to quickly figure them. And then that way, if you ever get asked, obviously you can, you can spit those back at

Nick Williams:

somebody. Well, that can definitely like turn, you know, turn off some of your skill when you're using the calculator. That's what's happened to me, like using a calculator all the time. I can't do quick math anymore. So I know that everybody gives you crap at work about not being tech savvy and all that, but. I'm sure there's some benefit to that because you're still using your brain.

Jason Yocum:

Love hearing that. I'm, I'm, I'm, uh, I, I've been told I'm the five people in my department. I'm in the top five in technology. Sometimes I've been six or seventh on a five person department, but I consider myself to be medium tech. Some people are going to think low, but at the end of the day, I, uh, I leveraged it, there's, there's a workarounds, but I'm, I try to improve. I'm not a dinosaur. I just don't play the tech game because I can never keep up. And then right when I've kept up something else is new. So that's kind of. The real reason for it

Nick Williams:

evolves quickly. Yep. Where can we find you? Like where, what all, what's some of your social media, where your, um, your business website, stuff like that. And we'll, we'll put all this in the show notes, but like where, where can people, where can people find you?

Jason Yocum:

So you can find me downtown or at a sporting event near you.

Nick Williams:

No, so you can see me in person. You can typically find

Jason Yocum:

me on Instagram, Facebook under a Boinglers. Obviously at the school, uh, come out and look at the hangar at any time if you're ever in the Indianapolis area, and then Condor Pickleball on Facebook and Instagram. Um, pretty easy to find, like to network, if you've got any networking opportunities that can help the two of us, I would encourage you to do it. And, uh, just, just really happy, I mean, this is, uh I had this day marked on the calendar ever since we talked about it. We got two awesome guests that are going to get to do the same thing. And I'm just glad to be a small part of it.

Nick Williams:

Yeah. Well, I mean, thanks for agreeing to let us, you know, reach up a little bit. It sounds like a

Jason Yocum:

winner. I just got a boxing gloves next time. Right? That's right.

Nick Williams:

You always yell me. All right. I hope that you've enjoyed this episode of Mosaic Minds. If you have and you can do us a favor and if you are watching, go ahead and click on subscribe and like the episode and then click on the bell just so you get notifications anytime we post. Although we are posting episodes Every Tuesday at 5:00 AM and if you're listening to this on an audio platform in the form of a podcast, if you could give us a five star review and just leave a little bit of writing after. It helps settle a whole lot. Thanks for watching or listening, and we'll see.